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Database on Unix, .Net Open Client with WCF webservice on Windows - How to connect?

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Database on Unix, .Net Open Client with WCF webservice on Windows - How to connect?

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We are working on a WCF webservice that uses .Net open client to integrate mfg/pro with a cloud based CRM. Our setup is as follows:

* mfg/pro (and Progress) is running on Unix,

* WCF webservice (that communicates with CRM and mfg/pro) is hosted on IIS in a Windows box.

During development, the sample Progress database, OE Appserver and WCF webservice were all deployed on a single windows box, hence it wasn't a issue then.

Currently we've the OE Appserver running on the Windows machine. Is the Appserver suppose to run on the Windows machine or Unix box where mfg/pro is running?

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  • The AppServer can be executed equally well on Windows and on Linux.

    Sent from Nine

    Von: sjaka80 <bounce-sjaka80@community.progress.com>
    Gesendet: Mittwoch, 20. Juni 2018 15:57
    An: TU.OE.General@community.progress.com
    Betreff: [Technical Users - OE General] Database on Unix, .Net Open Client with WCF webservice on Windows - How to connect?

    Update from Progress Community
    sjaka80

    We are working on a WCF webservice that uses .Net open client to integrate mfg/pro with a cloud based CRM. Our setup is as follows:

    * mfg/pro (and Progress) is running on Unix,

    * WCF webservice (that communicates with CRM and mfg/pro) is hosted on IIS in a Windows box.

    During development, the sample Progress database, OE Appserver and WCF webservice were all deployed on a single windows box, hence it wasn't a issue then.

    Currently we've the OE Appserver running on the Windows machine. Is the Appserver suppose to run on the Windows machine or Unix box where mfg/pro is running?

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  • Thanks Mike for your prompt reply, much appreciated.

    If the Appserver is running on the Windows box, how should I configure it to connect to mfg/pro database on Unix? Can you please direct me to some resource that discusses this?

  • You will need to connect via a network connection (the -H and -S parameters on the command line or ABL CONNECT statement).
     


  • So what is your exact issue here? Open client can connect to any application server regardless of the server OS.
  • The issues here I guess are:

    1) Since there are two different OSs involved, where is it preferable to put the Appserver (Windows vs. Unix)?

    2) How should I configure the Appserver to connect to database on Unix (if I place it on the Windows box)?

  • The AppServer will have faster access to the database if it is on the same machine as the database.

  • True, if you've never experienced remote client/server database connectivity (-H -S) then that will be a very long learning process.  It takes quite a bit of time to configure the database startup parameters ("SERV"ers) to support remote clients properly.  And, on the development side of things,  all your ABL runs quite a lot slower than it does with "shared memory".  

    There are also a number of management-related issues that you may be confronted with.  For example, "shared memory" clients are auto-trimmed whenever the database is restarted, but your remote client/server processes may need to be restarted manually because they don't recover very well on their own.

    If this is a new application, and you can afford the licenses, then you may want to look at investing in PASOE rather than "classic" appserver.  PASOE has a lot of features that you might benefit from.  The features may even allow you to bypass WCF in the scenarios where WCF is doing nothing more than working as a middle man.  Personally I love WCF and would probably use it either way, unless it caused additional problems.