“There ain’t no such thing as a free lunch.” - Moore’s Law and the Next Generation(s) - Forum - OpenEdge Development - Progress Community

“There ain’t no such thing as a free lunch.” - Moore’s Law and the Next Generation(s)

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“There ain’t no such thing as a free lunch.” - Moore’s Law and the Next Generation(s)

  • "I have read a bit about the actor model, but don't really understand how to use actors in a real world situation – how to model a problem with them. Can someone please explain?"

    programmers.stackexchange.com/.../how-is-the-actor-model-used (read the first answer to the question: "Actors, in the sense of modeling actions, with messages [..]").

      Another answer to your question Marian (if you were really interested you could have found them yourself - but no: you are mainly interested in being hired as progress programmer so why bother :-(  )  can be found f.e. here.

      Even in .net the actor model is implemented I see btw. Exotic Keith? Grr... For those with blinkers, yes. 

  • Especially this part of that answer (programmers.stackexchange.com/.../how-is-the-actor-model-used) I found interesting:

     "Helps focus on Task Based events rather than CRUD events. CRUD is simple but it's just like interacting with a filing cabinet. If we can provide more value than in the software we produce, why are we doing it? Tying multiple actions to a single "Update" command in a task based system is more useful than just saving to the DB. This also gets into stuff like CQRS." with this link about Task based UI: web.archive.org/.../

    "One of the largest problems seen in “A Stereotypical Architecture” was that the intent of the user was lost. Because the client interacted by posting data-centric DTOs back and forth with the Application Server, the domain was unable to have any verbs in it. The domain had become a glorified abstraction of the data model. There were no behaviors, the behaviors that existed, existed in the client, on pieces of paper, or in the heads of the users of the software. [..]" 

    I am writing a small bpms in elixir at the moment.  It works with websockets (a persistent connection via the web of a client and a backend). Many of them (in principle millions within elixir) can exist simultaneously for different users / tasks. That means many *statefull* connections, per connection I will use more than one actor. All these actors can communicate with other.

    Speech is silver, silence is golden, eh? :-)

  • 0) This is getting old and very unproductive imo.

    1) This was a holiday weekend in the US. Declaring a lack of responses as victory doesn't make it true.

    2) You don't really seem to be interested in having a realistic conversation about what can and cannot be done with OE, Oracle or MS-SQL (without the latest shiny tool/language). Comparing an application written the way it should have been from the start (service/action modeled, business logic driven, etc.) to a legacy application written poorly doesn't make the case for new language as much as it does for proper application design.

    3) Just because .NET added a feature doesn't make it main stream or important enough for OE to implement before other features. .NET, Oracle, SQL Server, etc. all have a large feature set... but most only use the common core features.

    4) You seem to think that everybody here only uses OE and has blinders on to everything else. I promise you there are those of us who have done large applications (thousands of concurrent users) in non OE languages and databases. I will put more faith in my real world experience with large applications than with your internet searches and playing around with Elixir. Sorry :-)

  • Convincing enough for the likers, not very impressing.  It's your work, good luck in your antique shop. :-)  I know some others that of course do not react that are interested.

  • Okay.. no more interactions with you because you obviously cannot be bothered to actually read what I post instead of just skimming and jumping to your own conclusions.  I have said numerous times that OE has issues but we obviously disagree on what those issues are.

    By the way... my "antique shop" is running Oracle, SQL Server, OE, PostgreSQL, Cassandra and a host of other technologies all running in a cloud environment.

    Best of luck in your future Elixir endeavors.

  • 4) You seem to think that everybody here only uses OE and has blinders on to everything else. I promise you there are those of us who have done large applications (thousands of concurrent users) in non OE languages and databases. I will put more faith in my real world experience with large applications than with your internet searches and playing around with Elixir. Sorry

    Convincing enough for the likers, not very impressing.  It's your work, good luck in your antique shop. :-)  I know some others that of course do not react that are interested.

    ---

    Someone wants to talk about something else other than OpenEdge in this forum and then bad mouth the technology.  That is bad form in this forum, which is dedicated to OE tech.

    What you should be bad mouthing are corporations that use the tech and insist on using character interfaces and years old techniques.  But hey, it makes money as is for them, it makes money for the developers who have to live with such things.  I'm sure Progress wants to get them off the old tech too!

    IOW, no amount of bad mouthing the technology is going to get the user base (ie, corps)  off old sh!t.  The user base is what pays the bills for nearly everyone on this site.  You can talk sh!t while the rest of us get the bills paid.

    All your doing, agent, is making yourself look bad for OE projects (and many others too.)  Be careful, Europe has more Progress work than the states and I am sure the bad mouthing isn't having anyone stand up and say "Hey, come work here!"

    Like you both say, I am a DB2, Oracle, MySQL, PostgreSQL, and Progress DB programmer with the ABL, HTML/Javascript, C, PHP, C++ and a bunch of languages you never heard of (net.data anyone?)  Progress it's self is pretty much a C shop from what I remember when I contracted here.  After all, the ABL is made with something.

    I am open to hearing about other tech, even though it might not be welcome by the admin of this site.


    But telling people they are welcome to work in their antique shop does not a good reputation make for getting paying work in OE.

    Amduus Information Works, Inc.

    Technical Services for Business and Government

    http://www.amduus.com/cms

  • I'm not afraid of my reputation. Not good to promote an angst culture. If someone thinks I cannot deliver good work because of my opinions that's not really a problem for me. I like freedom, honesty, open culture. On work in the Netherlands with oe: I already mentioned it 100 X: disappearing. Work in languages like elixir: appearing. Maybe it would be "smarter" to learn the most used, fe javascript / angular, but I like my job and programming in a really advanced language that makes it in the commercial world. It's not only going from chui to gui that makes up modernization, there is so much more to think about. Oe is mainly focussed on crud. But there is the task based ui, bpm, CQRS, DDD, the jsonb field/noSQL etc etc. And the free lunch is over, which can have consequences or your business in the long term.

      You can neglect the benchmarks you can find comparing phoenix / elixir with others of course. But it is already used in production for some time, and innovative companies in Holland use it. I have seen very advanced workflow solutions with web-based modelers (canvas elements and so). Not using some expensive bpm solution (not webbased, no seamless fit with the used development language and not built to meet the needs of a specific client or a specific group of clients) out of the box, but the opposite. Built with elixir / phoenix; most developers are full stack so they can create a canvas.

  • Well, my hiring wouldn't be for people shooting down other people as "antique" for having knowledge of a database system.  One more tool in the tool box.

    I still hold to the belief of the proper language for the proper job and resources.  Would I use R to write a database application - of course not.

    IOW, if one focuses only on Progress, then yes, one's options are limited.  But Progress is one tool of many out there that should be in a programmers tool box.

    Amduus Information Works, Inc.

    Technical Services for Business and Government

    http://www.amduus.com/cms

  • > Well, my hiring wouldn't be for people shooting down other people as "antique" for having knowledge of a database system. 

    I did not shoot with that reason. Should be clear already.

    > But Progress is one tool of many out there that should be in a programmers tool box.

    OE + db can be missed. There are other products. R I mentioned only for use as number-cruncher. But you understood that I think.

  • Ah, look at this Scotty! They realized advanced OO in elixir! Wow!

    www.youtube.com/watch